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Modulor,
Modulor

Modulor

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[{"lat":47.35613070346888,"lng":8.550907761036342},{"floor":"floorplan-1"}]
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Modulor
  • Modulor
  • Modulor
  • Modulor
  • Modulor
  • Modulor
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The Modulor system of proportions and measurements, published in 1950, combines various sets of ideas. In 1944, with a view to reconstruction after the end of World War II, Le Corbusier initially attempted to define a few basic dimensions for use on the construction site, all of them related to the human body. The starting point is a comfortable ceiling height of 226 centimeters, the height that can be reached by a raised arm. With the help of the geometric designs used to proportion his buildings, the architect tried to find a common denominator between these dimensions and the golden ratio. Le Corbusier thus worked out two related geometric numerical series that would also govern the height of a stool, chair, or table, as well as their legs and backrests—ranging from 226 centimeters to zero in the one direction and in the other to infinity. They form a geometric model that ensures harmonious proportions on all scales.

Tabourets Maison du Brésil, LC14, 1959 design, Le Corbusier, 2019 Cassina re-edition, on Portuguese slate flooring in Modulor proportions, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Literatureo

Le Corbusier, The Modulor: A Harmonious Measure to the Human Scale Universally Applicable to Architecture and Mechanics, trans. Peter de Francia and Anna Bostock, New York, 1954; repr. Basel et al., 2000.

Le Corbusier, Le Modulor, Paris, 1950 (French edition).

Image creditso

Tabourets Maison du Brésil, LC14, Entwurf 1959, Le Corbusier, Reedition Cassina 2019, auf dem Bodenbelag aus portugiesischem Schiefer in Modulorproportionen, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Büro im ersten Obergeschoss, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Modulor, Le Corbusier, 1956, Lithographie (1. Edition)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich, Plakatsammlung / ZHdK

Modulor, Konstruktionsprinzip
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Modulor, Anwendungsbeispiele verschiedener Nutzungshöhen, Tafel 26 aus «Le Modulor», Editions de l’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Boulogne 1950

Modulor, Beispiele verschiedener Formatteilungen, Tafel 39 aus «Le Modulor», Editions de l’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Boulogne 1950

Umschlag «Le Modulor», Editions de l’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Boulogne 1950