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Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass,
Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass

Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass

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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass
  • Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass
  • Enamel, Wood, Neoprene, Glass
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Le Corbusier called on the assistance of engineer Jean Prouvé (1901–1984) for the construction of the façade. Prouvé already had some experience with enameled metal panels. He was the one to propose glass panels with neoprene profiles as commonly used in vehicle construction—the same kind of profiles he had already deployed on a large scale, for example in the Tour Nobel high-rise in Paris (today called the Tour Initiale).
The colored enamel façade panels are mounted atop a folded iron sheet, which has thermal insulation and a vapor barrier on the inside and is covered outside with a plywood panel after assembly. The pavilion’s exterior shines forth in bright primary colors, while inside the warm natural tone of the oak veneer dominates.
The insulating glass panes were set into the metal frames from the outside using specially developed neoprene profiles. One clamping strip on the inside and one on the outside fix the pane in place. The profiles are welded at the corners.

Façade detail with enamel panels and bolts, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Literatureo

Alexander von Vegesack, ed., Jean Prouvé. Die Poetik des technischen Objekts, Weil am Rhein, 2005.

Image creditso

Fassadendetail mit Emaillepaneelen und Verschraubungen, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Obergeschoss, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Detailskizze der Befestigung der emaillierten Fassadenpaneele, Atelier Le Corbusier, vermutlich 1965
Abbildung: © Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris

Studien zur Neoprendichtung zwischen Stahlskelett und Verglasung
Abbildung: © Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris