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Ramp versus Staircase,
Ramp versus Staircase

Ramp versus Staircase

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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Ramp versus Staircase
  • Ramp versus Staircase
  • Ramp versus Staircase
  • Ramp versus Staircase
  • Ramp versus Staircase
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Listen to the text
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“A staircase separates one floor from another: a ramp connects them.” The ramp is a key element of Le Corbusier’s architectural vocabulary. The architect loved striding from one story to another, which was only possible with a ramp. The stairs inserted between the floor slabs were only to be given preference if one was in a hurry.
When Le Corbusier used the two different circulation modes in the same building, he wanted to offer people a choice. But he was just as interested in playing formal and symbolic contrasts off against each other. In Zurich, a closed ramp is attached to the outside of the compact exhibition pavilion, which has an open staircase at its center. While in other buildings—such as the iconic Villa Savoye—the ramp and the staircase are set directly next to one another in stark contrast, in the pavilion they are part of an “architectural promenade.”

Interior of the ramp with side windows, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Literatureo

Quoted from Willy Boesiger, ed., Le Corbusier et Pierre Jeanneret. Œuvre complète de 1929–1934, Zurich, 1935, p. 25 (Villa Savoye).

Image creditso

Innenraum der Rampe mit Seitenfenstern, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Rampe, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Treppe, Pavillon Le Corbusier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Querschnitt der Rampe, erste Baueingabe vom 12. Dezember 1961, gezeichnet von Guillermo Juan de la Fuente, unterzeichnet von Le Corbusier und Heidi Weber
Abbildung: Stadt Zürich, Hochbaudepartement, Planauflage / Archiv

Rampe in der Villa Savoye, 1960
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich, Grafiksammlung / ZHdK © René Burri / Magnum Photos

Fassadendetail mit Aussentreppe, Notre-Dame-du-Haut in Ronchamp, 1955
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich, Grafiksammlung / ZHdK © René Burri / Magnum Photos